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10 Facts About Poseidon – Greek Mythology

10 Facts About Poseidon – Greek Mythology

10 Facts About Poseidon - Greek Mythology

Poseidon

Poseidon is one of the twelve Olympians in Greek mythology. He is the god of water, and his domain includes the sea, storms.

He was a brother of Zeus and Rhea, with his other siblings being Athena, Apollo, Hermes, Demeter, Hestia and Hera. He was married to Amphitrite who bore him Triton as well as three Gorgons: Euryale. Stheno and Medusa.. His symbols include fish (the sea) and horse riding. His temple was located in Athens where he had a famous statue made by Phidias which stood outside the Parthenon on top of a few marble steps.

Poseidon was known to be an unpredictable god and was the source of much conflict on Mount Olympus due to his temper. He quarreled with Zeus frequently, who would have thrown him off Mount Olympus if it weren’t for Hera, Athena and Hermes.

One example of this is in the Odyssey where he sent a sea monster named Cetus to attack the Phaeacians’ ship after they angered him by killing one of his sacred bulls. Poseidon was also one of the few gods who consented to visit Thesprotia, where the Nagas (people who could not be killed by any mortal) ruled.

According to some sources, he fathered a son named Triton with Amphitrite. As Amphitrite was a sea nymph, this union did not please Poseidon’s wife who felt that her husband was becoming too attached with mortals and not enough with the sea. As a result, she swore vengeance on their son if he ever went back into his father’s domain.

Triton, however, loved the sea and decided to live there with his mother. In the Odyssey, it is said that Poseidon punished him for this.

Like other gods, Poseidon had several symbols. These were horses, dolphins and fish. His primary home was on Mount Olympus but his secondary homes were located in many places such as the Island of Rhodes called Helice which boasted a huge temple built by Daedalus in honor of the god. Another was at Cape Taenarum had another great temple dedicated to him. This temple contained a large statue which was said to have fallen from heaven (this may have been Zeus’s lightning although they seemed to be on good terms most of the time).

The origin of Poseidon

Some say that Poseidon was born to the Titans Rhea and Cronus. But before he could take over, Cronos (king of the Titans) swallowed him whole. Some theories suggest, though, that Rhea tricked Cronus into swallowing a stone instead of her child. Eventually, Zeus rescued his little brother and set him free in the ocean.
The origin of the god of the sea is a mystery.

Poseidon’s main weapon is a trident

There are several myths about the creation of Poseidon’s trident. The most popular one comes from Hesiod’s Theogony, Poseidon’s trident was forged by the three Cyclopes. A very long time ago, in a far-off land, there lived three cyclops – the sons of Poseidon. They were strong and worked hard from morning to night forging their father’s trident. The eldest Cyclops was called Brontes. The second Cyclops was called Steropes, and the youngest was called Arges.

Poseidon strikes the ground with his trident to start a spring or well of seawater. In one of the stories about him, he uses it to kill a Giant during the Gigantomachy (the battle of the Giants and the gods). Similarly, he also uses it to split rocks and create water sources.

In the Trevi Fountain, you’ll find a sculpture of Poseidon

The Trevi fountain is one of the most famous and most visited monuments in the world. It is an 18th-century Baroque fountain in Rome, Italy and was built at the request of Pope Clement XII.
The sculpture is the focal point of the fountain. It stands before a cascading pool. Unlike those in some other fountains, he is not shown as simply holding a trident but rather grasping it at two of its prongs.

The original was made by Nicola Salvi and was given to Pope Clement XII who had it taken to Rome, Italy in 1730 and placed near the Palazzo Quirinale which is now home to the Museo Delle Terme (Museum of Roman baths). This Baroque-style fountain with a single large figure represents an ancient idea that water would have eternal life-giving qualities if touched by a god’s hands.

Poseidon, according to mythology, is a god known for his hot temper and greed

Poseidon has a reputation among the most ill-tempered and greedy Olympian gods. He was a rather savage deity, who would often abduct mortals and pull them down to his underwater kingdom ruled by the relentless waves.

In Homer’s Odyssey, he is the king of the sea and river, as well as the father of dolphins. He encourages men and gods alike to violence in order to please him. He has been around since before anything else existed; when he emerged from Chaos at first light on the world, he was ruler of all that had been forged by Zeus and Hera.

Poseidon is also known as a god of navigation

Poseidon is also known as a god of navigation and the sea. He is well known for riding a chariot pulled by fish across the sea. Poseidon is the Greek version of the god Neptune, a Roman god of the sea.

Seafarers used to worship Poseidon, the god of the sea, for the safety of their voyage

The story of the sea, as told to us by seafarers in the past was that Poseidon protected them from storms. The ancient sailors thought that if they treated him with respect and gave him offerings, he would protect them on their journey—a voyage which could take months or even years for some.

The Greek god Poseidon lived in a fabulous palace under the sea that was made of jewels and coral

According to Greek mythology, Poseidon’s palace is located in the depths of the ocean. The palace is made from jewels, pearls, and coral, and its gates are guarded by giant bronze bulls.

Poseidon married Amphitrite, daughter of Nereus and Doris

Amphitrite’s parents were a royal pair, and from them she inherited the domains of the sea.
Amphitrite had three children with Poseidon, including Triton, Rhodos and Benthesikyme. As Poseidon’s wife she helped to calm his storms when they raged too fiercely – as any good wife ought to do.

Poseidon had many children, including gods, demigods, and other creatures

Poseidon had a wife called Amphitrite and many children including Triton. He also had sons with various women on Earth.
Some of his offspring were gods, demigods or other creatures like horses, dolphins and mermaids. Poseidon was very proud of his beautiful children and often boasted about them to other gods. Sometimes he would compare them to their godly counterparts and sometimes he would laugh at them for being mortal like humans.

Poseidon has been depicted in many movies, books and art

In Homer’s Odyssey, he saves Odysseus from Polyphemus by making him a sign to show that he was struck blind by Athena and Hera’s scheming. Poseidon was also known as an angry god who would occasionally try to punish humans for their wickedness with storms and floods.

The first depiction of Poseidon that I came across was in Homer’s Odyssey. In the story, Odysseus’s men accidentally angered Polyphemus by blinding him and Poseidon helped Odysseus escape by giving him a sign to indicate that he wanted him to stop. The next depiction of Poseidon that I found was on an old Roman mosaic called the ‘Battle between Michael and the Dragon’ in which he is seen riding a sea horse or Hippocampus while holding a trident. In another scene, the god is standing on a chariot drawn by two Hippocampi. The third depiction I found in the form of a Greek vase that depicts Poseidon and his children riding on Hippocampi. The fourth and final depiction of Poseidon in this post is found on an image of a cup produced by Ezzo (1344–1399). This cup shows scenes from a version of Homer’s Odyssey that was popular in the Middle Ages. In the scene, we see Odysseus’s men blowing into the ears of Polyphemus to make him drop his guard.

In conclusion, Poseidon has been depicted numerous times by several different artists. In addition to these depictions, he has also appeared in movies as well as video games and other forms of media.

 

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